Thursday, 1 March 2018

Script Magazine

Here are the latest Script Magazine newsletters:


Week in Review

 


 

Script Magazine

 


 

On ScriptMag.com this week, we have double the interview fun with two amazing interviews of the screenwriters of The Disaster Artist, compelling advice on writing disabled characters, a new course by Manny Fonseca on how to get past the reader, and more! Check out our full list of contributors and follow them on Twitter too.

Now get reading and get writing!
Read More...

 

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Stephens College
The Stephens College Low-Residency Master of Fine Arts in TV and Screenwriting: Come to Hollywood twice a year and learn from working writers. Our mission: To get more women writing for film and television.

Click here for more information.

 


 

Developing Diverse Stories Featuring Disabled Characters
If you're writing about disabled characters and you are not disabled, develop these characters beyond their abilities to tell an authentic story. Consider a disability part of a character's makeup, not the driving engine for your screenplay. Read More...

 

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http://www.finishlinescriptcomp.com/
The Finish Line Script Competition offers 6 pages of development notes so you can rewrite & resubmit new drafts FOR FREE! Our winner will meet/Skype with 32 top Film & TV mentors in Los Angeles, London, Canada & Australia.

www.finishlinescriptcomp.com

 


 

A Look Back at Screenwriter Interviews and Reviews of 2018 Oscar Nominated Films
Leading up to the 2018 Oscars, Script looks back at some of our articles, interviews, and film reviews that covered what are now Oscar-nominated films. Plus, download screenplays of this year's contenders! Read More...

 


 

Learning to Love Film Scheduling and Budgeting For Writer Producers
Paula Landry discusses the importance of learning the details of film scheduling and budgeting to elevate your writing. Read More...

 


 

NAVIGATING HOLLYWOOD Unexpected Path to Developing a Screenwriting Class
Manny Fonseca talks about the journey to developing a screenwriting class in the hopes of helping out beginning writers. He also gives out how to sign up for said class in a solid sales pitch. Read More...

 


 

This course is designed to give you as much information as possible to make sure your gatekeeper keeps reading and to better your chances of success. In addition to the course materials and discussion boards, you will have the opportunity to submit the first 30 pages of your script for critique by the instructor, focusing on the three major factors that go into getting a gatekeeper to be compelled to keep turning the page of your script and ultimately giving you a RECOMMEND. Enroll Now...

See full list of self-paced online courses here.

 


 

Our webinars include both access to the live webinar where you may interact with the presenter and the recorded, on-demand edition for your video library. You do not have to attend the live event to get a recording of the presentation.


See full list of upcoming live online webinars here.

 


 

SELLING YOUR SCREENPLAY Writer Director Producer Stephen Kogon Discusses Dance Baby Dance
Ashley Scott Meyers talks with screenwriter Stephen Kogon about his new film, Dance Baby Dance, and about making the transition from East Coast to Los Angeles. Read More...

 


 

The Oscar-Nominated Writers Behind The Disaster Artist (Part One)
Screenwriters Michael Weber and Scott Neustadter dig into details about the development and writing behind their Oscar-nominated comedy, The Disaster Artist. Read More...

 

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Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber Oscar Nominated Screenwriters of The Disaster Artist
Oscar-nominated screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber speak with Script about peeling back the layers of the unique story-within-a-story that is The Disaster Artist. Read More...

 


 

Nicola Yoon Discusses Diverse Books
Nicola Yoon’s poignant and timely The Sun Is Also a Star hit the New York Times bestseller list and remained there for forty weeks. Here, we talk with Yoon about her new work, seeing herself reflected on the pages of a novel, and the need for diversity in books. Read More...

 


 

Get a single video for $16.99 or subscribe for access to all the videos starting at only $16.33 per month! See all videos and subscribe for All Access here.

Our growing library of over 175 video tutorials covers both the creative and business sides of screenwriting, offering instruction from top industry experts!
Watch Previews of All Videos...

 


 

Eyes On The Prize How To Write Your Way To An Oscar
Bob Verini goes beyond screenwriting tips and tackles another aspect of the screenwriter’s American Dream, analyzing writing-award statistics to give you some hints that one day you, too, may be blessed by Oscar. Read More...

 


 

FILM REVIEW A Fantastic Woman
Christopher Schiller examines the complexities of Sebastian Lelio's film, A Fantastic Woman. Read More...

 


 


 

Jeanne Veillette Bowerman
Jeanne is the Editor of Script and adapted the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Slavery by Another Name. Her screenplays were selected as Top 25 Tracking Board Launch Pad, CSExpo Finalist, Second Round Sundance Episodic Lab, and PAGE Awards TV Drama Finalist. Twitter @jeannevb.

 

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Go behind the scenes with Oscar-nominated screenwriters!
   

 


 

Interview with Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber Oscar Nominated Screenwriters of The Disaster Artist

 


 

Oscar-nominated screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber speak with Script about peeling back the layers of the unique story-within-a-story that is The Disaster Artist.

If you’re interested in writing for TV, don't miss our live webinar, Writing The Fabulous TV Crime Serial on Thursday, the 22nd.

 

Advertisement
Stephens College
The Stephens College Low-Residency Master of Fine Arts in TV and Screenwriting: Come to Hollywood twice a year and learn from working writers. Our mission: To get more women writing for film and television.

Click here for more information.

 

By Andrew Bloomenthal
The Disaster Artist, written by screenwriting duo Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber, is the cherry on top of a series of extraordinarily unlikely events. It all began in 2003, with the filming of indie fiasco, The Room, a notorious cinematic atrocity of unprecedented proportions. The Room’s vampiric writer/director/star Tommy Wiseau claims he was aiming for a serious drama. He missed. With its perplexing plot, one-note characters, and dead-on-arrival dialogue that Marlon Brando himself couldn’t breathe life into, The Room bypasses guilty-pleasure good, and slams head first into train-wreck mesmerizing. And as anyone with even a peripheral awareness of film lore knows, this $6 million vanity project has since become the mother of all cult hits.

Years later, Greg Sestero penned a memoir entitled The Disaster Artist: My Life Inside The Room, the Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made, where he describes a tormented production, plagued with problems, due mainly to the blind arrogance of its cocky leader.

Neustadter and Weber spoke with Script about peeling back the layers of this unique story-within-a-story.  Read More...

 

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Jeanne Veillette Bowerman
Jeanne is the Editor of Script and adapted the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Slavery by Another Name. Her screenplays were selected as Top 25 Tracking Board Launch Pad, CSExpo Finalist, Second Round Sundance Episodic Lab, and PAGE Awards TV Drama Finalist. Twitter @jeannevb.

 

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$50,000 to winners.
   

 


 

A Special Offer from our Trusted Partner

 


About the Screenwriting Competition
Now in its 16th year, the Script Pipeline Screenwriting Competition seeks talented writers and exceptional screenplays to connect with production companies, agencies, and managers. Launched in 2003 as part of the early wave of screenwriting contests, Script Pipeline continues to cultivate relationships with the industry's top executives, focused specifically on finding writers representation, supporting diverse voices, championing marketable, unique storytelling, and pushing more original projects into production.
About the TV Writing Competition
The 11th Script Pipeline TV Writing Competition is searching for extraordinary television writers and fresh, compelling pilots for exposure to production companies, agencies, and managers. Launched in 2008 as a response to the growing demand for new episodic content, the competition has established its role as a go-to outlet for emerging writers looking to get staffed on shows or develop their TV material.
The company's distinctive long-term facilitation process helps contest selections find elite representation and gain crucial introductions to Hollywood, with $6 million in screenplays and pilots sold by competition finalists and "Recommend" writers since 2010 alone. Last year, close to 8,000 screenplays were entered in the Screenwriting and TV Writing Competitions, making Script Pipeline one of the leading companies reviewing unproduced material. Notable success stories can be found on the contest pages.
Finalists for both competitions receive immediate circulation to Script Pipeline partners, in addition to the following:
- $50,000 to winners

- Personal introductions to managers, producers, agents, directors, and others searching for new writers
- Development assistance with Script Pipeline execs
- Additional script reviews for potential circulation
- Long-term circulation for all finalists (and select semifinalists), tailored to each individual project
- Exclusive invitations to private writer/industry events hosted by Pipeline Media Group
*FILMMAKERS: visit Film Pipeline and submit a produced short or unproduced script. Launched in January 2018, it's a new platform to connect up-and-coming directors with agents and managers, as well as help get short films made. Learn more here.

 

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THE WRITING INTENSIVE: 5 Spots Open
   

 


 

A Special Offer from our Trusted Partner

 


THE WRITING INTENSIVE: 5 Spots Open. Finish your script for selling season with former Network/Studio President, Independent Producer (Academy Award Best Picture CRASH) and UCLA Film School Lecturer, TOM NUNAN.


Tom Nunan and LISA EBERSOLE (37 PROBLEMS Amazon, BROTHER Tribeca Cinemas) teach THE WRITING INTENSIVE. The only customized, professional writing experience that delivers DAILY assignments, support and feedback via 20-30 min phone sessions. Tom and Lisa are on the phone with you every M-F discussing your project. This is how networks and studios operate. This is the industry way.

THE WRITING INTENSIVE teaches writers to deliver at the professional level with skills they’ll use the rest of their writing lives. Clients include new writers and A-LIST pros around the world. The results speak for themselves: 3 projects produced, 10 projects optioned, clients signed with top-tier agencies, multiple staffing assignments––all from THE WRITING INTENSIVE scripts. All in the last 12 months.
With the pilot script I wrote, I won a contest and quickly landed a manager at a highly respected company! Tom and Lisa go above and beyond their call of duty.
––RACHEL TAFF, Showrunner’s Assistant SMILF


Their proven system creates real results and has transformed the way I write. My agents are thrilled with my new material. I’m writing at a higher level than ever before.
—L. PETERSEN, Law & Order SVU


Going from concept to fully polished script in a matter of weeks, with Tom and Lisa’s daily feedback and support, exceeded my wildest expectations. This was a game-changer for me.
—GREG CAMPBELL, Blood Diamonds, Hondros


THE WRITING INTENSIVE is 7 weeks for TV pilots; 10 weeks for feature screenplays.
Next Session Begins Monday March 12
Mention This Email And Get A $200 Discount

BOOK YOUR SPOT
For more information, contact Tom Nunan directly at 310.569.1617 / tom@bullseye-ent.com or Lisa Ebersole at 917.414.8829 / lisa@37problems.com




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Week in Review




 


 




Script Magazine

 


 





On ScriptMag.com this week, our family of contributors share advice on writing query letters, finding screenwriting contests success from anywhere in the world, writing inspiration and more! Check out our full list of contributors and follow them on Twitter too.

There are as many ways to break into the industry as there are writers. One way is to enter screenwriting contests. Get our FREE Download Tips for Winning Screenwriting Contests to help you succeed in the next contest you enter!

Now get reading and get writing!
Read More...

 


 




Writing The Killer Query Letter

Barri Evins essential pointers on the steps to writing a killer query letter that succeeds in getting a response, not the query letter that leaves you dead in the water. Read More...

 


 




Building Momentum with Screenwriting Contests

Marty Lang shares how screenwriting contests can open doors for writers living far from Los Angeles. Read More...

 










 


 




What Is Your Ideal Writing Life?

Every writer needs support and encouragement. Lynn Dickinson's advice will support and assist you in creating a powerful and useful writing tool – an effective Vision of your Ideal Writing Life. Read More...

 


 




Screenwriter Director Brian Discusses New Film Mom and Dad Starring Nicholas Cage

Ashley Scott Meyers talks with screenwriter and director Brian Taylor about his latest feature film, Mom and Dad, and how his early career directing videos and commercials turned into a career in features. Read More...

 


 





The world of the feature film is booming and you are gushing with ideas. This workshop will give you the tools to get the ideas out of your head and into a completed screenplay by introducing you to the methods that professional screenwriters use to write under deadlines. By the end of this workshop, you will have a first draft of a feature length screenplay. Enroll Now...

See full list of self-paced online courses here.

 


 





Our webinars include both access to the live webinar where you may interact with the presenter and the recorded, on-demand edition for your video library. You do not have to attend the live event to get a recording of the presentation.


See full list of upcoming live online webinars here.


 


 




The Post and Its Main Character

When adapting a true story, like The Post, Paul Joseph Gulino examines the need to be willing to explore the main character beyond the facts and into a level of growth in order to tell a more complex and compelling story. Read More...

 


 




WRAC Launches a Community for Writer Accountability

What do you do when you can't get the words on the page and no one is around to keep you accountable? WRAC, Writer Accountability, was created to help writers set goals, be accountable and share tips and advice in a supportive community. Read More...

 



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Writers Digest and Script Mag Are Joining Forces

We’re thrilled to announce that Script Magazine and the Writers Store will be joining Writer’s Digest on an all-new, fully redesigned website at writersdigest.com in 2018. The new site will be a one-stop writing wonderland full of all the resources you need to succeed. Read More...

 


 




Love of Death and Destruction

Pamela Jaye Smith and Monty Hayes McMillan discuss how to put the love of death and destruction into your stories and characters for more drama. Read More...

 


 





Get a single video for $16.99 or subscribe for access to all the videos starting at only $16.33 per month! See all videos and subscribe for All Access here.

Our growing library of over 175 video tutorials covers both the creative and business sides of screenwriting, offering instruction from top industry experts!
Watch Previews of All Videos...

 


 




Improve Plot and Character Fast Explore A Character’s Junk Drawer

Marilyn Horowitz gives a fun and unique exercise to improve plot and character in your screenplay or novel. Read More...

 


 




Creating Character Transformation Through Understanding the Void

Jen Grisanti explains how when we learn to fill the void in story and in life, we can guide the transformation of our characters to help them achieve their goals. Read More...

 


 


 





Jeanne Veillette Bowerman
Jeanne is the Editor of Script and adapted the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Slavery by Another Name. Her screenplays were selected as Top 25 Tracking Board Launch Pad, CSExpo Finalist, Second Round Sundance Episodic Lab, and PAGE Awards TV Drama Finalist. Twitter @jeannevb.

 







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Finding Adaptation Material
   

 


 

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In this week's screenwriting tip, Marty Lang discusses the hundreds of years worth of stories that anyone can use for adaptation without paying a dime. They live in what's called the public domain.

Don't miss the chance to save hundreds of dollars with Writing a Novel for Screenwriters Premium Collection. The collection includes Scrivener, six webinars and four ebooks with a total value of $575.49 for the price of just $99! If you’ve ever wanted to write a novel, this is the kit you need to get started.

 


 

By Marty Lang
The world of film and television screenwriting is inundated with intellectual property. The current wave of superhero movies all stem from comic books. Video games have been turned into films for years. Some of the biggest television shows of this decade have been based on popular books. And the Oscars even have a special category for Best Adapted Screenplay. Some of that material is made by celebrity creators, or corporate behemoths, so the cost of the film rights to it can be huge.

But there are hundreds of years worth of stories, images, sound and video that anyone can use without paying a dime. They live in what's called the public domain, creative material that is not protected by intellectual property laws. The individual author or artist doesn't own these works anymore; the U.S. public does. If you're interested in writing a new script (and who among us isn't?), working with public domain materials can be a great way to get inspired – and maybe get your project some attention.  Read More...

 

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Jeanne Veillette Bowerman
Jeanne is the Editor of Script and adapted the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Slavery by Another Name. Her screenplays were selected as Top 25 Tracking Board Launch Pad, CSExpo Finalist, Second Round Sundance Episodic Lab, and PAGE Awards TV Drama Finalist. Twitter @jeannevb.

 

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 F+W, 10151 Carver Road, Suite 200 Blue Ash, OH, 45242 USA

 




Week in Review




 



 


Script Magazine
 
 




On ScriptMag.com this week, we share advice on making sure your script is ready for a reader, tips for working on assignment, packaging a film for sale, and more! Check out our full list of contributors and follow them on Twitter too.

Now get reading and get writing!
Read More...
 
 



The Mercedes Test for Your Spec Screenplay

Professional screenplay reader Stewart Farquhar explains the importance of giving your spec screenplay "The Mercedes Test" - is it worth the sales price or even the time to read. Read More...
 
 



Batman Begins

David Goyer, who co-wrote Batman Begins with director Christopher Nolan, reflects on the creative choices he and Nolan made in bringing the darkest of the DC Comics’ characters to life. Read More...
 








 
 



Steve McQueen American Idol

Dan Goforth speaks with Jon Erwin about this unique odyssey centered around one of the world's most iconic movie stars: Steve McQueen. Read More...
 
 



What is Film Packaging

Entertainment attorney Christopher Schiller explains the intricacies of film packaging… as well as the dilemmas. Read More...
 
 




This is a great course for writers who have always wanted to try screenwriting, but are unsure of how to get started. It’s also a good course to help screenwriters take their screenplays to a new level by better understanding how to write in the language of the screenplay. Enroll Now...

See full list of self-paced online courses here.
 
 




Our webinars include both access to the live webinar where you may interact with the presenter and the recorded, on-demand edition for your video library. You do not have to attend the live event to get a recording of the presentation.


See full list of upcoming live online webinars here.

 
 



Canadian Screenwriter Jason Filiatrault Discusses New Indy Comedy Entanglement

Ashley Scott Meyers talks with with Canadian screenwriter Jason Filiatrault about his new comedy, Entanglement, which stars Thomas Middleditch. Read More...
 
 



Elevate Your Story by Pushing Your Hero Off a Cliff

Is your story falling flat? Jeanne Veillette Bowerman shares tips on how to elevate your story by literally, or not so literally, pushing them off a wall. Read More...
 


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The Tunnel

Paul Peditto shares the process of how the screenplay came to be for Muhammad Bayazid's The Tunnel and his amazing journey to make this film. Read More...
 
 



Tips for Writing Movie Sex Scenes

Bob Verini gives pointers on how to write movie sex scenes, using excerpts from well-written sex scenes to demonstrate a writer's options. Read More...
 
 




Get a single video for $16.99 or subscribe for access to all the videos starting at only $16.33 per month! See all videos and subscribe for All Access here.

Our growing library of over 175 video tutorials covers both the creative and business sides of screenwriting, offering instruction from top industry experts!
Watch Previews of All Videos...
 
 



Does Your Story Deliver

Does your story deliver? Barri Evins’ pointers on how to ensure you don’t disappoint your reader or your audience by fulfilling the promise of your story. Read More...
 
 



Protecting Your Writing

Protecting your writing is a lot harder once you've "made it" in Hollywood. Doug Richardson explains the upside to getting ripped off. Read More...
 
 
 




Jeanne Veillette Bowerman
Jeanne is the Editor of Script and adapted the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Slavery by Another Name. Her screenplays were selected as Top 25 Tracking Board Launch Pad, CSExpo Finalist, Second Round Sundance Episodic Lab, and PAGE Awards TV Drama Finalist. Twitter @jeannevb.
 






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The Formula Debate




 



 


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With a large movement away from three-act screenplay structure, Drew Yanno offers why he thinks that shift exists and what the real rebellion is all about.

If you want to the tools the professionals use, you need Final Draft 10, the most popular screenwriting formatting software.

 








 


By Drew Yanno

I received an email from a graduate student asking permission to use a quote from one of my columns here on the Script magazine site for use in his thesis. His topic was/is Understanding Fractured Narratives.

Contained in the request was his off-hand observation that he believes that there’s a “subtle rebellion” afoot in the screenwriting community regarding three-act structure.

My response to him was that the rebellion is most certainly out there, but it’s not that subtle. In my opinion, there is a large movement away from three-act structure, and I thought I’d offer a column on why I think that is and what I think the real rebellion is all about.

First of all, I freely admit to being a structure guy. I feel like I’m in pretty good company in that regard since the great William Goldman admits to being in that camp as well. However, that doesn’t mean I’m a rules guy. And there’s a difference.  Read More...
 


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Jeanne Veillette Bowerman
Jeanne is the Editor of Script and adapted the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Slavery by Another Name. Her screenplays were selected as Top 25 Tracking Board Launch Pad, CSExpo Finalist, Second Round Sundance Episodic Lab, and PAGE Awards TV Drama Finalist. Twitter @jeannevb.
 






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Week in Review
  

 

 
Script Magazine
 
 
Letter from Editor
On ScriptMag.com this week, our family of contributors share advice and tips to help your career, including pitching advice, screenplay analysis and more! Check out our full list of contributors and follow them on Twitter too.

Our ScriptXpert Critique Service is back! Our team consists of more than experienced working screenwriters, we also have story analysts, development execs, directors, producers, and even filmmakers. Rest assured, we do not hire interns or college students. We only use readers who understand the industry on a professional level. Get Coverage or Coverage with Development Notes to see how your screenplay stacks up to what studios are looking for. Rush service available!

Now get reading and get writing!
Read More...
 
Advertisement
MFA spalding edu
Spalding's affordable, top-tier low-residency screenwriting MFA serves industry professionals, new scriptwriters, and aspiring professors. Students with a produced script may accelerate their studies. Alumni have sold features and TV episodes and won national competitions. Faculty offer East and West Coast sensibilities. Flexible scheduling, cross-genre study, optional travel abroad.

Inquire here.
 
 
Whats Holding You Back from Becoming a Professional Writer
The path to being a professional writer can be harder when you become your biggest obstacle. Jeanne Veillette Bowerman dishes out tough-love advice to help you achieve your writing dreams. Read More...
 
 
What Makes Buyers Invest in Your Movie
Great screenplay writing has strongly defined characters that attract financiers, studios, actors, and directors. Wendy Kram gives advice on creating memorable characters. Read More...
 
 
The Six Axes of Screenplay Analysis
Ray Morton's process of screenplay analysis involves examining five key story components. In part two, he discusses the final key components. Read More...
 
 
Pitchfest Pet Peeves
Manny Fonseca examines his biggest pitchfest pet peeves when it comes to attending pitchfests as an executive. Do you fall into any of the following categories? Read to find out. Read More...
 
 
Take this journey with Michele to discover the inside information that designs a literal map to your success. You'll have the knowledge and know-how that you will need to move ahead without the common blunders of a new writer. Enroll Now...

See full list of self-paced online courses here.
 
 
Our webinars include both access to the live webinar where you may interact with the presenter and the recorded, on-demand edition for your video library. You do not have to attend the live event to get a recording of the presentation.


See full list of upcoming live online webinars here.
 
 
Three Simple Steps to Master the Rule of Show Dont Tell
Show, don't tell is one of the classic adages about writing. But what does it really mean? Ross Brown explains how what the character does defines them more powerfully than what they say. Read More...
 
 
 
From Novel To Screenplay with Duncan Falconer on His Action Film Stratton
Ashley Scott Meyers talks with Ex-British Elite Special Forces operative, Duncan Falconer, about how he was able to get his action novel turned into the feature film, Stratton. Read More...
 
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Improve Your Writing: 6 Tips for Becoming a Better Writer
Looking to improve your writing? When Tim Knox's clients ask him how to become better writers, he offers these six get-started tips. Read More...
 
 
What Football Has That Your Script Needs
So what does football have that today's movies do not? Danny Manus breaks down the game of football to help screenwriters understand what their own script needs to succeed. Read More...
 
 
Get a single video for $16.99 or subscribe for access to all the videos starting at only $16.33 per month! See all videos and subscribe for All Access here.

Our growing library of over 175 video tutorials covers both the creative and business sides of screenwriting, offering instruction from top industry experts!
Watch Previews of All Videos...
 
 
Are Script Consultants Worth It
Are script consultants worth the money? Jeanne Veillette Bowerman shares her opinion on consultants and insights into a professional screenwriter's habits. Read More...
 
 
Sign up for Writers Digest Annual Conference in NYC August 10-12th
Writing conferences are an important tool for learning, pitching, but most importantly, networking. Writer's Digest Annual Conference is in NYC in August, and we'll have both screenwriting and writing sessions. Come and join us! Learn More...
 
 
 
Jeanne Veillette Bowerman
Jeanne is the Editor of Script and adapted the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Slavery by Another Name. Her screenplays were selected as Top 25 Tracking Board Launch Pad, CSExpo Finalist, Second Round Sundance Episodic Lab, and PAGE Awards TV Drama Finalist. Twitter @jeannevb.
 
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Screenwriting coverage is now available through Writer's Digest Shop

 
 

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Now available at Writers Digest Shop

 
The first stop, after you submit to a production company or studio, is Coverage, an analysis and rating of your script by a professional reader who's been trained to spot exactly what Agents, Managers, Producers and content buyers are looking for in a screenplay. ScriptXpert is a team of professionals will help you polish your script and iron out all the wrinkles you didn't know you missed. They know exactly what agents, managers, and producers are looking for in a solid screenplay.

 
$149.00

 

 
*If you have any questions, please call us at 1-855-840-5124.

 
 

F+W, 10151 Carver Road, Suite 200 Blue Ash, OH, 45242 USA

 




Writing a richer story!




 



 


3 Simple Steps to Master the Rule of Show, Don’t Tell
 
 



In this week's screenwriting tip, Ross Brown explains how what the character does defines them more powerfully than what they say and offers tips on showing instead of telling.

We’re excited to have our ScriptXpert Critique Service back!. Our team consists of more than experienced working screenwriters, we also have story analysts, development execs, directors, producers, and even filmmakers. Rest assured, we do not hire interns or college students. We only use readers who understand the industry on a professional level. Get their great advice on your story today!

 








 


By Ross Brown

Show, don’t tell. It’s one of the classic adages about writing. And yet I find many of my students aren’t clear what it means or how to achieve it in their work. Does it mean writing more description? Am I supposed to throw in gratuitous action scenes?

No. “Showing” means several things. It means actively dramatizing character traits rather than merely writing them in the description of the character or flatly stating the character trait in dialogue. It means using strong, active verbs in your descriptions. It means externalizing the internal, finding a way to give the audience a window into what your characters are thinking and feeling through their actions and the decisions they make, rather than having the character just come out and say what they are thinking – which is boring and anti-dramatic. Let’s take each of these one at a time and look at them in more detail.  Read More...
 


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Jeanne Veillette Bowerman
Jeanne is the Editor of Script and adapted the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Slavery by Another Name. Her screenplays were selected as Top 25 Tracking Board Launch Pad, CSExpo Finalist, Second Round Sundance Episodic Lab, and PAGE Awards TV Drama Finalist. Twitter @jeannevb.
 






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